Caregivers may from time to time be visited by an uncomfortable visitor – GUILT.  This visitor can come from any direction.  It may be the client’s relative, or even friends that think you are not doing things correctly.  It may be that the one we are actually caring for is just never satisfied with how we are doing things.  Guilt may come from our own heart.  You might second-guess whether you are doing things right or just doing the right things. The biggest problem is feeling guilty before God. Did you do something wrong to cause this situation to happen? Is this in any way a punishment? Confess your feelings of guilt.

We need to get our thoughts and feeling surrounding guilt out into the open in some way. We might be experiencing a mixed bag of strained relationships, confused roles, feelings of inadequacy, or other things woven in with our feelings of guilt.  (1 John 1:8-10)

Why It’s Hard To Let Go of Guilt

One of the reasons it’s hard to let go of our guilty feelings is that;  they feel safe. We are our own boss and we can avoid our own guilt.

We’re used to dealing with guilt the same way we handle our imperfections- hiding or pretending they didn’t bother us.

We might have used fear or punishment to motivate our corrective actions or behaviors.

We might have rebelled against anyone or anything that tried to control us.

Depression comes, and we now live with regret.

We may be motivated by guilty feelings out of habit, as a learned response and also as a preferred choice.

You might become resentful, bitter, self-defensive or even angry. This option just breeds more guilt or self-centeredness.

Confession is central to restoring right relationships, even with ourselves.

We often say if I could go back and start all over again…  But this is not reality. We are where we are in life.  We need a safe place to let our feelings out. As a general rule, caregivers do the best they can with the information they have at any given time.

Give yourself grace and lose the guilt!

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